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Third Dam Removal from Raritan River!
 

Folks,

Removal of dams across the Raritan River is a major achievement for the most densely populated State in the Union, New Jersey.

Raritan River, largest stream lying wholly within New Jersey, formed by the confluence of the North Branch Raritan and the South Branch Raritan rivers in western Somerset county. It flows about 75 miles (120 km) generally southeast past Somerville, Bound Brook, and New Brunswick into Raritan Bay of the Atlantic Ocean. Navigable to New Brunswick, it supplies (via pumping) the Spruce Run (1963) and Round Valley (1965) reservoirs. The name was probably derived from an Algonquian word meaning "stream overflows," or "forked river.

This will be the project's third dam removed from New Jersey's largest inland river that starts as the South Branch out of Budd Lake and the North Branch in Mine Hill that's also known as Black River and the Lamington River, all part of the 1,100-square mile drainage basin full of the river's tributaries.

Please take a few moments to read the history and enjoy the links to the videos posted on You Tube giving informative context to the removal of the third dam!

Regards, Roomi Nusrat

  • Removal of the Nevius Street Dam in Raritan Borough is the third dam elimination project on the Raritan River over the past three years that has been financed by a landmark natural resource damages settlement secured by the DEP in 2010 with El Paso Corporation, which is now Kinder Morgan. It will further open a 10-mile stretch of the middle and upper portions of the river to fish spawning and migration, and will allow for more recreational opportunities.
  • The dam off Nevius Street in the borough was built in 1901 and has been a fishermen's favorite ever since. Its demolition will open the river to a spring spawning run of American shad all the way to the Headgates, a waterfall dam at the upstream west end of Duke Island Park.
  • Known to locals as "the falls," the Nevius dam's where generations of Raritan kids and adults from all over have caught fish off the falls and below. Upstream used to be a mostly silted-in mud bottom, but below there were always bass and panfish the year-round and trout in the spring.
  • In addition to American shad, hickory shad, herring and striped bass also come upriver from the ocean, and although shad often jump when hooked by anglers, they don't jump over falls or dams. The shad, scarce in the river, can swim past waterfalls during floods.
  • The Raritan is heavily stocked with spring trout but, unlike some other big rivers, gets no walleyes, northern pike or channel catfish. Looks like anglers may see more shad, but will lose their all-year fishing hole in Raritan.
  • Calco Dam in Bridgewater was the first of three dams whose removal was financed by compensation for past pollution from a refinery and three polymer plants. That dam was demolished in July 2011, then the Robert Street Dam about a mile upstream from Raritan was taken out last summer.

(Text credit: www.britannica.com www.DailyRecord.com www.NJ.com)

Video Links:

Removal of first, Calco Dam

www.youtube.com/watch

Robert Street Dam Removal Part 1

www.youtube.com/watch

Robert Street Dam Removal Part 2

www.youtube.com/watch

IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

From: "Debra Hoover"

July 22, 2013

START OF THIRD DAM REMOVAL FROM RARITAN RIVER TRENTON - On Tuesday, July 23, at 10 a.m., the Department of Environmental Protection and Duke Farms will host a joint event as work begins to remove a third dam from the Raritan River, to create a more free flowing river, as part of a natural resources damage settlement.

The DEP's Division of Fish and Wildlife Director Dave Chanda will be joined by Duke Farms Executive Director Michael Catania, Somerset County Freeholder Peter Palmer and Raritan Borough Mayor Jo-Ann Liptak, who will speak at the event.

There will be ample opportunities for photos or videos of the dam removal work from the bridge overlooking the dam and for interviews on the engineering and environmental aspects of the project.

Removal of the Nevius Street Dam in Raritan Borough is the third dam elimination project on the Raritan River over the past three years that has been financed by a landmark natural resource damages settlement secured by the DEP in 2010 with El Paso Corporation, which is now Kinder Morgan. It will further open a 10-mile stretch of the middle and upper portions of the river to fish spawning and migration, and will allow for more recreational opportunities.

For GPS users, the event will be held on the Nevius Street Bridge in Raritan Borough, near 20 Mill Street, Raritan, 08869.

Directions: Approaching from Route 206 North or South, turn onto Orlando Drive, which merges with Canal Street. Turn left onto Nevius Street and then left onto Mill Street.